Philadelphia

During one of holiday weekends, I went to Philadelphia to visit for the first time. It was a 5-hour drive but I opted for the 1 hour flight instead.

I had a fantastic time in Philly! It was pretty diverse and there was so much to do. I visited tons of museums, including looking at my favorite artists.

My visit also reminded me of why it is so great to be an American! I toured the independence hall and the liberty bell. It’s crazy to think that our forefathers had the courage to rebel against Great Britain, the most powerful country in the world at that time. It’s even more amazing to think that the 13 original colonies all united together to fight for their beliefs.

Locum Tenens Blogs – September 2017

 

This month, I enjoyed reading Nurse Practitioners: Doing What You Love, Loving What You Do from TinkBird which gives some suggestions on how nurse practitioners can empower themselves.

 

How Will Working With Millennials Change Your Healthcare Career? was an interesting article to read since I am a millennial myself. I liked how it mentioned that locum tenens may be a good fit for many millennials.

I also recommend checking out these two articles from Barton Associate’s Blog:

7 Reasons to Work With a Locum Tenens Agency Instead of a Medical Group

7 Ways Healthcare Professionals Can Reduce Stress and Burnout

 

 

Florida Nurse Practitioners

Finally some good news for Florida Nurse Practitioners! Starting on January 19th, 2018, Florida RN’s will be able to convert their licenses to a multi-state license. This means we will be able to join the Nurse Licensure Compact. As a result, we will be able to acquire quicker licensing endorsements when applying in the other 25 states that are part of the Nurse Licensure Compact. Some of these states include: Texas, North Carolina, Georgia, Maryland, Missouri, and Utah. Although we may use our RN Florida license in these other states, we will still need to obtain new ARNP licenses. However, the wait time will be cut in half since we won’t have to wait for 2 licenses to be processed.

For more information, visit Enhanced Nurse Licensure Compact Implementation.

 

Locum Tenens Blogs – August 2017

Last week was Locum Tenens Week! It’s amazing to think how locum tenens originally started as a way to provide care in rural communities while physicians completed their training. Now it has become a large network which staffs a variety of professionals in all kinds of settings, including nurse practitioners.

5 Ways Locum Tenens NPs Are Changing Healthcare is a great article illustrating how locum tenens nurse practitioners are helping battle the primary care provider shortage.

Barton Associate’s posted several profiles last week about some of their locum tenens Nurse Practitioners and CRNA’s. Below are two profiles that I found interesting and wanted to share:

My Locum Tenens Story: Meet Marti J., Traveling Locum Tenens Nurse Practitioner

My Locum Tenens Story: Meet Mark V., Locum Tenens CRNA

Lastly, for both new and experienced locum tenens Nurse Practitioners, at times it an be a struggle finding the right agency to work with. Check out: How to Choose the Right Locum Tenens Company.

If you missed last month’s Locum Tenens blogs, feel free to check them out here!

Questions from Readers

Each month I will include a blog entry answering some of the most common questions I get from readers about locum tenens as a nurse practitioner. Feel free to comment any questions you have or email me at travelingNP.com@gmail.com.

How does dating work as a locum tenens nurse practitioner?

 

Many traveling nurse practitioners I know travel with their spouse or significant other. The agencies will certainly accommodate your needs with lodging. Some partners have flexible jobs where they can work from home, making it easy for them to travel. Some partners will fore-go their current job and may pick up seasonal jobs in their new living area. I also know some couples that will just take turns visiting each other throughout the assignment.

For single locum tenens nurse practitioners, traveling actually helps with the dating process. People always ask me if it’s hard to date since I am always moving around. I tell them no, that in contrary it is actually easier to date since I am traveling. This is because I end up meeting way more people than I normally would. I am even able to meet different types of people too.

Miami isn’t known for having an intellectual atmosphere, which made dating pretty tough when I lived there. Being able to move to different cities, I am able to meet people that more closely fit my needs.

Some of my friends that are travel nurses, ended up dating someone while on an assignment. To figure out if things would work, they extended their assignment. If the relationship became serious they eventually just settled down in that city permanently.

In a couple of states that I traveled to, I ended up meeting and dating someone while I was there. By the near end of my assignments, I had to contemplate if staying was worth it. In one instance, I decided to move on. In another case, I decided to extend my assignment to see where things would go. It was nice to have that companionship while I was there, but I do not think I am at the stage where I am looking for something long-term.

Locum Tenens Blogs – June 2017

Each month I share blog posts about locum tenens and nurse practitioners from around the web.

Considering a Locum Tenens Nurse Practitioner Assignment? Here Are 3 Questions to Ask

Great article about some important questions to ask prior to starting an assignment or during an interview.

Staying Centered on the Road: Tips for Traveling Locum Tenens Providers

Some interesting tips on maintaining your overall health with life on the road.

Need a Vacation? How to Hire a Locum Tenens Physician or Clinician for Your Private Practice

I think this article can easily address reasons why any nurse practitioner should consider working in locum tenens.

Questions to Ask: Finding the Right Locum Tenens Assignment

For those of you just starting out in locum tenens, this article includes a list of recommended questions for you to ask your recruiters.

Lastly, Barton Associates just released this Nurse Practitioner Resource Hub which is a good tool for all nurse practitioners, even those not currently traveling.

Frustrations of Starting in Locum Tenens

I have been working as a traveling nurse practitioner for a while now, that I forgot how frustrating it could be to initially work in locum tenens.

 

  • Tons of paperwork: Each time you accept a new assignment you have to be credentialed with the new site. This requires filling out tons of paperwork and providing copies of your licenses, vaccination records, certifications, references, etc. If you are also working with a new agency for the first time, expect your paperwork to double. In addition, you will have to do a drug test for both the agency and site.

 

  • Last minute: There will be times you won’t know your exact start date until 1 week out or less. There will be times you wont know where you will be living until the morning you leave. It may be scary at first, but part of working in locum tenens is being okay with the unknown. After a while, you get used to knowing things last minute.

 

  • Licensing issues: Is your license taking longer than you thought? Maybe you didn’t realize you also need a prescribing license, in addition to the RN and ARNP licenses in that state. Some agencies have really good licensing teams that can get in touch with the state board of nursing and expedite the processing of your licenses.

 

  • Recruiters: Not having a good relationship with your recruiter can make your locum tenens experience awful. Your recruiter should be your advocate. If they are putting you down and not being helpful, ask for a new recruiter!

 

I think the above four topics are probably the most frustrating aspects of starting a career in locum tenens. After a while, you get used to those things and realize the benefits of being a traveler outweigh the nuisances. Also, keep in mind that being a traveling nurse practitioner isn’t for everyone.